Google

Company
Google
Headquarters
Mountain View, CA
# of employees
10,001+
Industry
Tech
Website
https://about.google/

Diversity Report - Gender

Icon of a mail envelope
Female

32.0%

Icon of a mail envelope
Male

68.0%

Diversity Report - Race/Ethnicity

Asian

41.9%

Black

3.7%

Latinx

5.9%

Native American

0.8%

White

51.7%

Portrait icon
female
asian
queer
21-30
not disabled
not a veteran
Associate Product Marketing Manager, Youtube
-
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
June 17, 2020

End-to-end

The makeup of the leadership team doesn't have enough diversity. It's something that they're working on, but as of now it isn't great.
June 17, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

I've been lucky in terms of management. Both of my managers have been women of color, and they've made efforts to hold activities that foster community. I've been on two different teams, and my first manager definitely cared a lot about fostering a community within the team. She always checked in, and I would've felt very comfortable talking to her about anything. My second manager always starts meetings with an emotional check-in and asks if there's anything going on in our lives outside of work that we'd like to bring up. There was an incident where our leadership made an offensive comment in a meeting. I brought it up with my manager and she supported me and helped me send an email about it.
June 17, 2020

Company culture

Google is such a huge company, it's basically 100 companies in one. It depends a lot on your bigger team. On my first team I felt super comfortable because it was fairly diverse and our leaders made an effort to created an open environment for expressing concerns, work-related or not. I have seen other teams that don't really embrace the same culture. I know some people that say that they don't feel comfortable openly talking with their teams. From what I've heard, the marketing org is much more inclusive and facilitates more open dialogue around race and other structural problems inside and outside of the company than the engineering org. They don't have as many conversations around creating inclusive environments.
June 17, 2020

Training and career development

They have implicit bias training, but it is not very helpful. They are basically just click-through online classes. The online implicit bias trainings are mandatory to take annually. Managers have to go through diversity training, but it's unclear what happens in that training or how they apply the training in the workplace. There's also a lot of in-person diversity/allyship trainings but rarely are they mandatory. There's some training around that baked into the orientation every employee goes through when they first start at Google, but after that, I don't think any in-person trainings around diversity/allyship are mandatory.
June 17, 2020

End-to-end

The makeup of the leadership team doesn't have enough diversity. It's something that they're working on, but as of now it isn't great.
Portrait icon
female
middle eastern
queer
Associate Product Marketing Manager
-
San Francisco, CA
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
July 8, 2020

Diversity programs

The ERGs at Google are too big. They have their own executive boards that are made up of very senior people. They aren't as accessible or tight-knit as other company programs, and they're impersonal. I read the events that they have and get the newsletters, but I don't actively participate.
July 8, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

Both of my managers are new hires; it was both of their first times managing. The relationship has been very open. There have been requests to up-manage and get feedback from me, and I was comfortable giving that feedback, but in both cases I felt like I wasn't set up for success in the beginning of the relationship. I wish they would have invested more in talking about my career with me.
July 8, 2020

Company culture

It's hard to feel impactful. Most roles that junior people fall under are very small buckets of larger projects. You feel like you're doing something operational. Even if you were to get on a big project, you wouldn't want to because there are so many blockers - legal reviews, PR reviews - that are in your way. It's hard to feel like you matter to the company.
July 8, 2020

Company culture

It's open and inclusive. It's very easy to voice opinions without worrying about the effects. Like many big companies, it's very political. The one who speaks the loudest in the room often gets the promotion.
Portrait icon
black
latinx
(Former) Strategy & Operations Associate
-
San Francisco, CA
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
Yes
August 10, 2020

Promotion discussions

I left because I felt like I was lacking clarity on what was next for me. Despite performing well on my performance reviews, I looked internally and externally and decided to leave.
August 10, 2020

Company culture

At the micro-level, the people were incredible. People were very kind, very passionate, very excellent at what they did. I absolutely loved my co-workers.
August 10, 2020

Promotion discussions

A lot of people do not like the performance process. The experience varies by team, so it's a hard topic to explain. One of the major pain points is that they say that there's no quota for promotions or performance ratings, but it often feels like there is one.
August 10, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

My first manager happened to be a Black man, and he was great and super supportive. He really set the tone for my whole Google experience and empowered me to bring my whole self to work.
August 10, 2020

Promotion discussions

Google has a standard performance process. It happens bi-annually. On the tech side, you self-nominate yourself for promotion, but on my side, it was a conversation with my manager. My first promotion went really well. Google has levels, and it felt like the scope of my role wasn't changing.
Portrait icon
female
asian
heterosexual
21-30
not disabled
not a veteran
Product Analyst
-
Bay Area
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
July 10, 2020

Company culture

It really depends on what team you work on. I feel cared about as a human and as an employee. For a huge company, it is fairly relaxed day-to-day; I feel like I can be myself, wear what I want, and eat what I want. I could not imagine working elsewhere.
July 10, 2020

Training and career development

The access to training and formalized mentorship opportunities is pretty abundant. We have an internal site that's basically a university with in-person and virtual courses. You can learn how to code or learn to make Babkas. There's a whole team focused on fostering various types of learning. It's very much encouraged, but it's hard to balance with your day job.
July 10, 2020

Training and career development

There's a program called Coffee Club for Googlers who identify as female in the company. It's amazing. They put a call out for mentors and mentees, randomly assign cohorts, and create a syllabus for discussion. It's great to get to know and learn from people I wouldn't have interacted with otherwise. Coffee Club is one of many cross-discipline opportunities that reminds you there's more to the company than the bubble of your own team. Also, community contributions are highly regarded in addition to your core role in performance and promotion conversations.
July 10, 2020

Diversity programs

In the last several months especially, there's been a concerted effort to prioritize diversity efforts and recognize needs for improvement in the hiring process and misconduct reporting process. The programs are genuine, but the equitability and perception of accessibility among regular employees varies depending on team- and org-culture. For example, in Google marketing creatives, teams are working to improve visual representation of different types of Google users (e.g. not only users from English-speaking markets). In situations of workplace misconduct, some teams are better than others for creating safe spaces for anonymous reporting and employee health check-ins.
July 10, 2020

Application and interview process

I really enjoyed my Google interview experience. The process was well-oiled. The interviews were challenging, but the recruiters were responsive. I really liked the new team I interviewed with, and I felt confident that I'd be well taken care of, since it was led by one of my former teammates.
Portrait icon
male
white
homosexual
21-30
Staffing Services Associate
-
San Francisco, CA
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
June 3, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

My relationships have been inconsistent. I had one manager that came from a consulting company, and she was big on being transparent and supportive. My current lead is much harder to relate to. It's difficult because we have a great interpersonal relationship, but there are times when I feel like he's not very transparent with us and I leave conversations feeling like I don't have clarity. Your relationship with your manager shouldn't be an obstacle. I feel like I have to circumvent him to get a promotion. I instead try to work with LGBT leads, but there's only one on a global level.
June 3, 2020

Promotion discussions

I just wish the promotion process was more equitable and transparent. I've seen first-hand that the promotions aren't fair, and some deserving people have gotten passed over while others have gotten promoted.
June 3, 2020

Training and career development

I've found a mentor through the ERG buddy program. She's LGBTQ and she's helped check me a lot. Since I'm entry-level, she's helped to give me an objective look at my career. She helped me edit my resume and also seek out other career opportunities at the company.
June 3, 2020

Promotion discussions

We're reviewed twice a year, and we have to submit self-assessments where we review everything that we've done over the last six months. I really like that we get to self-advocate and pick our peer reviewers, but it's hard for two reasons: 1. The self-advocacy skill is really important. White men are typically much more comfortable talking about the work they're doing, so if you aren't comfortable talking about your work, it's hard to present your case, and then your manager has an even harder time presenting your case. This happens even more so for people in Strategy and Operations, where you don't have set metrics to hit. 2. You have to have great relationships with your manager. It's not always the easiest to relate to white straight men, who dominate the manager position. You don't know what they're saying in those meetings.
June 3, 2020

Diversity programs

My experience has been relatively positive. The LGBT ERG is called the Gayglers. I do really like that the ERG is a great way to network and meet other people in the company. They do a good job about educating members and supporting one another. The part I don't like is that there's a bit of a divide between the older Gayglers and the younger ones. There's been some controversy around renaming the group to include people that have different sexual identifications.
Portrait icon
black
latinx
(Former) Strategic Partner Manager
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New York City, NY
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
September 25, 2020

Accessibility

Google has a lot of issues when it comes to retaining talent from underrepresented minorities, but they do have the resources to help people go through whatever they're going through.
September 25, 2020

Accessibility

My therapist told me about how so many people were coming to him with impostor syndrome. Google doesn't have that many roles where you can do intellectually stimulating work, so a lot of people find themselves asking ‘what's next' after they get here.
September 25, 2020

Training and career development

It was hard for me to see myself staying at the company because there weren't a lot of people that looked like me in leadership. We found ourselves asking “how do we see hope in staying at this company and becoming executives at the company when the current managers don't look like us?”
September 25, 2020

Training and career development

I never really spoke for myself and drove conversations when it came to promotions. I didn't speak up enough to do things that would have benefited my careers. When i look back, I can't tell if it's because I'm first-gen, or if there were structural limitations within the company that didn't allow me to grow and see a future at the company.
September 25, 2020

Company culture

It's very transparent and very ambitious and driven. It's also very hopeful when it comes to diversity topics. They have a lot of resources to be able to bring in a lot of diverse people, but they struggle to retain them. The company has the right intentions, but keeping them was an issue. A lot of the people that I started with as an intern also left.
Portrait icon
female
black
Financial Analyst
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West Region
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
May 27, 2020

Promotion discussions

I've been lucky to have managers that have really vouched for me and really supported me during my career. At the same time, I'm really upfront about what I want, so in a way, they don't have a choice.
May 27, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

When I was up for promotion, the way my last manager came for me made me feel loved and supported. She told me what to do for my performance reviews and what experiences to highlight so that I was ready and so that I knew what I was talking about. When you go through the process, you create a packet of the work that you've done, and she was so supportive in making sure that the way I spoke about my work was detailed to say “I did XYZ, and this was the end result.” I couldn't have expressed the work that I did to that caliber without her assistance.
May 27, 2020

End-to-end

The Bay itself is just a different experience compared to my friends in Atlanta or other cities. Sometimes I ask if I would've needed to be as involved in ERGs if I was based in New York. I might not have felt the need to be the person to plan those events if I was in one of those cities.
May 27, 2020

Application and interview process

I met Google recruiters through the MLT (Management Leadership for Tomorrow) process. One of the interviewers ended up being my first manager. I was interviewing mainly for consulting positions at the time, so it helped that I had practiced case interviews because I could use some of those frameworks for the Google interview.
May 27, 2020

Company culture

Tech is such a different industry in comparison to other industries. We have wellness centers on campus at work, so if you have certain doctor's appointments, you can just go to the on campus doctor. They gave us a company-wide day off last week to prevent burnout with all the COVID-19 going on. Sometimes, it can be hard to unplug because the work culture is so flexible. So, if I'm on a flight, I can pull out my laptop and start working. It's different compared to my friends in Finance who can only access their work on private networks.
Portrait icon
male
latinx
heterosexual
21-30
Legal Assistant
-
West Region
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
June 4, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

I've have more than a handfull of managers over the years. It definitely inhibited my growth to a point. There were a lot of unfortunate circumstances where managers switched companies or I got moved to a different part of the organization, and that hurt my morale. My first manager was not very understanding. Middle managers are generally just worried about their own bottom line, although in some cases, you have managers that care and want you to grow. You have to try to figure out what kind of manager that you have. Figure out the personality type of your manager and how to approach them so you can get where you want to be. I've also learned to change my own approach to be more direct about wanting a promotion and making sure that I outline the things I need to do to get promoted. "
June 4, 2020

Training and career development

There is a six-month period where you're called a ‘Newgler' and you go through initial training for your role. I had to put my head down and learn about my role. I did discover that asking questions and open communication was encouraged. There are Googler to Googler opportunities where you can learn things like Yoga or Python from another employee. I started classes on graphic design. If there are things that you want to learn, that's a great conversation to have with your manager to find a way to incorporate those things into your work.
June 4, 2020

Company culture

When I started, and I felt very accepted very quickly by my peers. Googlers in general will be pretty happy to help you out. I've made a lot of good friends at the firm. You can be as isolated or as included as you want. Since I was on the main campus in Mountain View for a couple years, there were some really fun events. I spoke to friends at Microsoft, and they said it's not like that there. I know some people have had bad experiences, but those experiences are based on working with bad apples.
June 4, 2020

Diversity programs

The ERG's are part of the culture. I've made a lot of good friends through HOLA - the Latino ERG.
June 4, 2020

End-to-end

There are a lot of good mental health resources. That's a big topic today, and the firm has done a good job promoting empathy amongst employees. Everyone has their own communication style, and it's about learning how to communicate with different kinds of people.
Portrait icon
male
black
21-30
Partner Manager
-
San Francisco, CA
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
June 1, 2020

Promotion discussions

The promotion process is not clear to many people, but it's especially opaque for Black people. There aren't that many blacks on P&Ls at Google and generally blacks either leave the company after 1-2 years or transition to DEI or other non P&L facing roles. Blacks are typically the last to be promoted and are under-leveled and underpaid when they come into Google
June 1, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

I've never had a Black manager. I have had a number of white female managers. Most have been good. Some are horrible Managers vary in the amount of support that they provide. They come from many of the same backgrounds in terms of Ivy League schools or prior work experience, so when they come to Google and they have their first interactions with Black people, they often have trouble interacting with them.
June 1, 2020

Diversity programs

The diversity programs do well. The ERGs are really good; they're a big reason why I have stayed at Google. Every year, there's an outreach trip where we go to a different part of the country and do service work with different communities. We went to New Orleans after Katrina, to Charleston after the shootings in 2015. The groups vary based on the office. I definitely feel like there's a sense of community with the ERGs.
June 1, 2020

Diversity programs

I think that Google cares. They explicitly say that they want their minority employees to succeed. Google doesn't have a diversity problem, it has an attrition program. They can't cultivate Black people to stay at the firm and move upward. For example, with the BOLD program, probably 75% of the new hires leave the firm after 1-3 years. The company often brings in people, but then under-levels them. That's the case as a whole, but especially for Black people. People might have been an Account Executive at another company, but they come to Google as an Account Manager. That leads to them not getting enough work, getting bored, and ultimately wanting to leave.
Portrait icon
male
black
21-30
(Former) Technical Recruiter
-
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
Yes
June 13, 2020

Company culture

I was a contractor and then I became full-time. As a contractor, the culture is different than if you're full time. Your team really impacts your experience with the culture. On my first team, I felt like I could be myself, and I felt like I was embraced for that. On my second team, I knew the manager was newer, so I didn't have as positive of an experience. If I hadn't had that positive experience with that first manager, I probably wouldn't have stayed at Google as long. In terms of work-life balance, it depends on your manager, but they let me be myself and work as I wanted, as long as I was doing my work.
June 13, 2020

Diversity programs

I think the diversity programs are effective. Over the last few years, they really started to be genuinely interested in diversity. Google has partnered with different minority groups - HBCU's, etc. - to make an effort to start earlier in the cycle for recruiting minorities. They also had training and content around being aware of unconscious biases, especially in recruiting.
June 13, 2020

Diversity programs

I had two managers; the first was good. I got all of the support that I needed from him. He understood his limitations, and was able to advise me on the things he knew about, but then he also was able to point me towards people that could help me with other things if he wasn't as knowledgeable. He was really good about making sure I knew what questions I needed to ask. He was the best manager I've ever had. The second manager was not as good. He wasn't good at giving specific recommendations for different problems. He wasn't a good listener and he didn't look to understand the problem; he just gave a response. The team was bigger and I think he was just kind of spread too thin. Overall, Google does a better job of promoting and developing managers than Facebook does.
Portrait icon
female
asian
black
queer
21-30
not disabled
not a veteran
Account Manager
-
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
February 9, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

I feel comfortable expressing my needs and empowered to steer the conversation to benefit my career trajectory.
Portrait icon
male
black
Site Reliability Manager
-
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
June 29, 2020

Company culture

Someone has described company culture as, “College where you get your tuition money back.” This perfectly fits the dynamics of working at Google. Some workspaces even resemble college campuses.
June 29, 2020

Company culture

I would say I have a reasonable work-life balance; however, after a certain level of engineering, work can get dizzy. We deal with big issues that can lead to some burn-out and not being able to end the day as early as I would like.
June 29, 2020

Company culture

Team culture at Google has fell before, but it is overall better than other places I have worked. My current position has outstanding team culture. I absolutely feel that I can be myself at work. I have never been made to feel uncomfortable about my identity in the workplace.
June 29, 2020

Diversity programs

The diversity programs are genuine, and have positively impacted my work experience. I am personally very involved with the Black Googler Network, and I appreciate all of the ERGs at Google. These programs are effective in building a sense of community and providing resources.
June 29, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

Management at Google is very supportive and proactive about trying to make a difference. This is especially true during the recent time of protest. They make me feel comfortable, and I don't have to watch my tone when sharing my thoughts.
Portrait icon
male
asian
white
bisexual
21-30
not disabled
not a veteran
Account Strategist
-
Redwood City, CA
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
December 15, 2019

Relationships with manager(s)

I just got a new manager, so it is still developing. However, I think my manager is trying really hard and definitely goes to bat for me.
December 15, 2019

Company culture

Google is great at really everything to be honest. The pay is good, but not as competitive as other tech giants in the bay, but still very good. Their benefits are second to none! The health insurance plan, the perks and benefits at work, etc. are all wonderful and a huge draw for employees. For me, I find work life balance to be very strong at Google, at least in my specific role. Overall, I love the culture at Google and think they do a fantastic job!
December 15, 2019

Salary and benefits

I think Google could improve on pay to be more competitive with other tech companies. I also think they could continue to improve in terms of diversity and inclusion.
Portrait icon
male
asian
latinx
heterosexual
21-30
not disabled
not a veteran
Account Strategist
-
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
December 2, 2019

Relationships with manager(s)

Great relationships with all the managers I have had. They highly aware and passionate about inclusiveness
December 2, 2019

Diversity programs

Invest a ton in diversity initiatives and actually show they are working on enabling the best outcomes for all employees. We regularly have open discussions on inclusiveness in a variety of forms and forums.
Portrait icon
female
heterosexual
41-50
not disabled
not a veteran
(Former) Associate
-
West Region
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
March 17, 2020

Relationships with manager(s)

The relationship is mainly metrics driven. While managers intend to be fair, there is a bell curve applied to the team. During each review cycle, Managers must designate who will receive top and lowest scores. Depending on your relationship with your manager, it might be important to closely align your accomplishments with a manager's goals to gain recognition.
March 17, 2020

Training and career development

Google is an incredible place to learn big tech, sales strategy and marketing strategy as well as product management process.
March 17, 2020

Diversity programs

ERGs could be empowered raise the voices of minorities within the company. In my experience, they are working to raise awareness of other cultures and celebrate diversity, but seldomly result in improving diverse representation in leadership. This is an issue that is not unique to Google.
Portrait icon
female
asian
heterosexual
21-30
Cloud Solutions Engineer
-
Austin, TX
Tenure:
Would you recommend this company to a friend?
Yes
July 7, 2021

Application and interview process

Application itself wasn’t bad, very typical. I sent in my resume and transcript, filled out basic identifying info, and wrote a series of short essays before being interviewed. I had to try and write in a relatable way as someone who has software engineering skills but is also empathetic and able to connect/communicate with others well.
July 7, 2021

Application and interview process

Another nice thing during the interview process is that the people interviewing switched my pronouns and all my identifying information to be anonymous, so the hiring team had no bias when making their decisions.
July 7, 2021

Application and interview process

Relationship with recruiters started off smoothly since they were female too, and I clicked with them easily. Being able to talk to another female and have my bubbly, talkative personality be accepted felt great and made me comfortable throughout the process. The recruiters were also very open about advocating for me at the end of the hiring process. In terms of updates and general communication, they were super responsive; I communicated a lot with my recruiter and always felt like I was having an actual conversation with her. In a way, that responsiveness helped humanize the recruiters a little, making the whole feel more personal.
July 7, 2021

Promotion discussions

My program is a cohort of 25 people, and we’ve had a couple meetings with managers where they’ve discussed the promotion process. Apparently, a significant part of it is based off what your peers say about you and how they perceive you, so I expect there to be some biases and prejudice surrounding the process. It also sounds like this might lead to people putting up certain fronts in the work environment during their interactions with others. From what I’ve seen, they say it’ll mostly be performance based but that might not be the case always.
July 7, 2021

Company culture

Google’s motto is something along the lines of “do good,” or “be a good person,” and so far, I’ve actually found that to be true. I was intimidated by the company name at first, but my interviewers ended up being super warm and down to earth. It was one of the best interviews I’ve ever had. Everyone tends to get along and is very friendly with one another.